《英诗金库》I-53:Prothalamion, by E. Spenser


作品基本信息

作品名称:Prothalamion
作者:Edmund Spenser(爱德蒙·斯宾塞)
出版年代:1599
编注:此诗选自《皆大欢喜》第二幕第七场,诗中将大自然的善与人类的恶进行了对照。

作品原文

Calm was the day, and through the trembling air
Sweet-breathing Zephyrus1 did softly play—
A gentle spirit, that lightly did delay
Hot Titan's beams, which then did glister fair;
When I (whom sullen care,
Through discontent of my long fruitless stay
In princes' court, and expectation vain
Of idle hopes, which still do fly away
Like empty shadows, did afflict my brain)
Walk'd forth to ease my pain
Along the shore of sliver-streaming Thames;
Whose rutty2 bank, the which his river hems,
Was painted all with variable flowers,
And all the meads adorn'd with dainty gems
Fit to deck maidens' bowers,
And crown their paramours3
Against the bridal day, which is not long4;
Sweet Thames! run softly, till I end my song.

There in a meadow by the river's side
A flock of nymphs I chanced to espy,
All lovely daughters of the flood thereby5,
With goodly greenish locks all loose untied
As each had been a bride;
And each one had a little wicker basket
Made of fine twigs, entrailed6 curiously,
In which they gather'd flowers to fill their flasket7,
And with fine fingers cropt full feateously8
The tender stalks on high.
Of every sort which in that meadow grew
They gather'd some; the violet, pallid blue,
The little daisy that at evening closes,
The virgin lily and the primrose true,
With store of vermeil9 roses,
To deck their bridegrooms' posies
Against the bridal day, which was not long:
Sweet Thames! run softly, till I end my song.

With that I saw two swans of goodly hue
Come softly swimming down along the lee10;
Two fairer birds I yet did never see;
The snow which doth the top of Pindus strow
Did never whiter show,
Nor Jove himself, when he a swan would be
For love of Leda, whiter did appear;
Yet Leda was (they say) as white as he,
Yet not so white as these, nor nothing near;
So purely white they were,
That even the gentle stream, the which them bare,
Seem'd foul to them, and bade his billows spare
To wet their silken feathers, lest they might
Soil their fair plumes with water not so fair,
And mar their beauties bright,
That shone as Heaven's light
Against their bridal day, which was not long;
Sweet Thames! run softly, till I end my song.

Eftsoons11 the nymphs, which now had flowers their fill12,
Ran all in haste to see that silver brood
As they came floating on the crystal flood;
Whom when they saw, they stood amazed still
Their wondering eyes to fill;
Them seem'd13 they never saw a sight so fair
Of fowls, so lovely, that they sure did deem
Them heavenly born, or to be that same pair
Which through the sky draw Venus' silver team;
For sure they did not seem
To be begot of any earthly seed,
But rather angels, or of angels' breed;
Yet were they bred of summer's heat, they say,
In sweetest season, when each flower and weed
The earth did fresh array;
So fresh they seem'd as day,
Even as their bridal day, which was not long:
Sweet Thames! run softly, till I end my song.

Then forth they all out of their baskets drew
Great store of flowers, the honour of the field,
That to the sense did fragrant odours yield,
All which upon those goodly birds they threw
And all the waves did strew,
That like old Peneus' waters they did seem
When down along by pleasant Tempe's shore
Scatter'd with flowers, through Thessaly they stream,
That they appear, through lilies' plenteous store,
Like a bride's chamber-floor.
Two of those nymphs meanwhile, two garlands bound,
Of freshest flowers which in that mead they found,
The which presenting all in trim array,
Their snowy foreheads therewithal they crown'd;
Whilst one did sing this lay
Prepared against that day,
Against their bridal day, which was not long:
Sweet Thames! run softly, till I end my song.

'Ye gentle birds! the world's fair ornament,
And Heaven's glory, whom this happy hour
Doth lead unto your lovers' blissful bower,
Joy may you have, and gentle heart's content
Of your love's couplement;
And let fair Venus, that is queen of love,
With her heart-quelling son upon you smile,
Whose smile, they say, hath virtue to remove
All love's dislike, and friendship's faulty guile
For ever to assoil.

译文

戴镏龄 译

宁静的日子呀,阵阵清风
轻微地吹拂,在空中飘荡,
大气柔和,使晴空的骄阳<>
明媚温煦,不致烧灼碧空;
我正感不受用,
由于淹留王廷常是失意,
期望终成梦想,无从实现,<>
冀求的东西都徒然飞逝,
无影无踪,心情苦不堪言,
于是散步排遣,
沿着清凌凌的泰晤士河,
两岸上发出稠密的枝柯,
各种奇卉,无不鲜花怒放,
青草地上珠光宝气繁多,
宜于装饰闺房,
插在情人头上,
迎接佳期,屈指就在目下,
可爱的河,轻轻流到歌罢。

河边上呈现出一块草坪,
那儿我瞥见仙女一大群,
好姑娘,在邻近川泽成长,
头上飘散着美丽的青鬓,
好象新人出聘。
她们都携着一只小柳筐,
细条做料子,精工编织成,
用来采集花枝,满满盛装,
纤纤手指,摘取巧妙认真,
顶部嫩的花梗。
草原上这样那样花灿烂,
每样采一些,紫罗兰淡蓝,
黄昏时合上眼睛的雏菊,
以及百合纯洁,樱草烂漫,
嫣红玫瑰成束,
献作新郎礼物,
迎接佳期,屈指就在目下,
可爱的河,轻轻流到歌罢。

接着有漂亮的天鹅一双,<>
飘飘然在水上顺流下游,
平生初见,最美的鸟两头,
雪洒在坪达山的高峰上,<>
输掉白的光芒;
宙父变做天鹅追求妮黛,
也比不上这对赛粉欺银;<>
论白,宙父、妮黛难分好坏,
但是都难和这一双接近,
她们异常白净。
轻柔的流水,负载着她们,
似嫌形秽,戒浪花莫溅喷
她们的洁羽,那样就必然
使浑水给她们带来污痕,
让太阳般美颜
因此添上缺陷,
迎接佳期,屈指就在目下,
可爱的河,轻轻流到歌罢。

仙女采花不久,收获丰满,
奔去看这对洁白的俦<>侣,
正泛泛而来,清水上漂浮,
姑娘见了,无不感到茫然,
惊得直瞪两眼;
这样的美禽,似从未见过,
多可爱呀,一定生在天堂,
或是给爱神挽车的双鹅,<>
挽她的车穿过云霄之上;
她们绝对不象
我们这个尘世间的产物,
而是天使,或是同一种族。
据说她们是在夏季出生,
和煦时节,花草枝叶扶疏,
大地新装披身,
好似旭日东升,
恰似佳日,屈指就在目下,
可爱的河,轻轻流到歌罢。

仙女从筐里取出许多花,
这些都是田野上的光辉,
发散出扑鼻的阵阵香味;
她们把花撒向好鸟身上,
水波吐秀流芳,
象泌罗斯江水流声活活,<>
沿着丹丕的可喜山谷间,
满载花枝,从帖撒利流过;
有数不尽的百合花,乍看,
象香闺的铺板。
这时其中两位仙女挑选

我的感想

[1]

参考文献

[1] As You Like It. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/As_You_Like_It

脚注

1Zephyrus: 'the west wind.'(西风。)
2rutty: 'abounding in ruts.'(查词典,“rutty”一词为“遍地车辙的”之义,但看译文,此处似乎译作“有很多枝干”的意思了?)
3paramours: 'lovers'.(情人们。)
4is not long: 'is close at hand.'(近在眼前了。)
5the flood thereby: 'the stream which ran beside them.'(他们身边流过的小溪。)
6entrailed: 'entwined.'(相互缠绕的。)
7flasket: 'a long shallow basket' (Johnson); the word is a diminutive of 'flask.'(长而浅的篮子;对“flask”的爱称。)
8full feateously: 'very skillfully or elegantly.'(非常灵巧而优雅地。)
9vermeil: a poetic form of 'vermilion.'(“朱红色”的另一种写法。)
10the lee: here and in L 115 below, Spenser uses this word for 'stream' or 'current.'(在此处和下面的第115行,斯宾塞用这个词来表示“溪流”或“水流”之义。)
11Eftsoon: 'soon after.'(很快。)
12had flowers their fill: 'flowers, as many as they wanted.'(已经拿了尽可能多的花朵。)
13Them seem'd: 'it seemed to them.'(在她们看来。)


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